ASL Storytime –2.22.20 – FEELINGS

ASL Storytime –2.22.20

This is a special storytime that I do with a deaf mother and an interpreter. We do the entire storytime in both American Sign Language and in English. The goal is to teach the kids some signs, while also being accessible for signing families.

  • Rhyme – The More We Get Together
    • Whenever we do this storytime we bookend it with this rhyme. We teach the signs for: more, together, happy and friends.

The more we get together, together, together
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be.
‘Cause your friends are my friends and my friends are your friends.
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be. 

  • Identifying Feelings –  Happy, Sad, Mad, Scared, Silly, Surprised51wfrfpb1el._sx406_bo1204203200_
    • We get into our theme by teaching the main signs we will be using throughout the storytime. This time we are going with feelings. I have faces on our SmartTV to match the signs.
  • Book – How Do YOU Feel? By Anthony Browne
    • We are going to tweak the story a little to go with a Q&A format. I ask my deaf mother, “How do you feel” and she answers. This back and forth, with me having a repeating line seems to work best in this type of story time. The kids can sign “How do you feel” with me by the end.
  • Rhyme – If you’re happy and you know it
    • I’m a little scared for this one because I don’t feel confident enough to sign the whole thing. But as usual, my mother will sign the whole thing and I will do the signs I know while speaking it all.

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, then you really ought to show it.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.

Mad and you know it stomp your feet; Sad and you know is say boo hoo.

  • Game – Feeling Faces / or “Roberta Says…” with feelings51w0tgkittl._sy498_bo1204203200_
    • I will have faces with expressions on popsicle sticks and we will ask the kids to sign and make the expressions on the sticks.
  • Book w/ props – The Feeling Flower by Leah Mahealani Dakroub
  • Rhyme – Sometimes I Feel…
    • Finally, we will do one more rhyme to reinforce the feeling signs we have learned.

Sometimes I feel happy,
Sometimes I feel sad.
Sometimes I feel curious,
Sometimes I feel mad.

Sometimes I feel silly,
Sometimes I feel surprised.
How many feelings,
Do I have inside?

  • Rhyme – The More We Get Together
    • We end the way we started.

The more we get together, together, together
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be.
‘Cause your friends are my friends and my friends are your friends.
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be. 

How’d it go:

This was such a diverse group and such a fun storytime! We had deaf families, hearing families, students taking ASL classes and some librarians observing the storytime. Our pacing was a little fast but ultimately went really well. So many people were signing. This was a great outline to enforce repetition.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Bilingual English & American Sign Language Storytime: Creating a Model

Hi Guys, I recently submitted an article to the Collaborative Summer Library Program and it was published in their November newsletter. It’s targeted to librarians, so I though I’d share it here:

More and more children’s librarians are incorporating American Sign Language into their storytimes. Sign language can be a great early literacy tool because it helps babies express themselves before they can use spoken words. Because of this, I wanted to create a bilingual storytime model that would be accessible for both hearing and deaf families, creating an inclusive community event.

First and foremost, it takes two to make this program work—a children’s librarian with a passion for ASL and a native ASL storyteller who is Deaf. The children’s librarian provides his/her knowledge and best practices of children programming, while an ASL storyteller contributes the bilingual/cultural/deaf awareness aspect for the program. By collaborating together, the pair can present an integrative storytime that meets the needs of all who may benefit.

The trick is to use rhymes, songs and stories that will be familiar to your patrons, but will also lend itself more easily to introducing signs. Having a common thread in the theme that lends itself to sign repetition (i.e. farm animals or colors) is very important. Pick stories and rhymes that will encourage the audience to use the same signs again and again. Introduce key signs before every story, song, or rhyme.

When selecting books to read, we’ve found that stories that include a dialogue going back and forth work best. “Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See” or “I Went Walking” are prime examples of picture books that can be read/signed as a conversation between the storyteller and the librarian. In both of these books, the librarian doesn’t have to learn to sign the whole book. Instead they learn a single phrase, which is repeated throughout the story. For example, in “Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See?” the audience can join in by signing along with the librarian. The audience and librarian can ask the performer, “What did you see?”  The ASL Storyteller will then respond by giving the sign for the animal, color, or object.

Another strategy is to pick a fun song like “The More We Get Together” as an anchor for every bilingual storytime. We’ve found that bookending our storytimes with the same rhyme, gives the audience something familiar at the start and end of each storytime. Repeat the rhyme—starting out slow and get faster and faster each time to make it fun, while still reinforcing the signs.

A dress rehearsal an hour before the performance is extremely important especially when using an ASL interpreter.   During the rehearsal, the librarian, storyteller and interpreter will work on the timing, tune alignment and choreography to the songs to ensure that they each are in sync with one another. This can be achieved through cues from the interpreter and eye contact between the storyteller and the performer.

Make sure there is always signing on stage. If the librarian is speaking without signing, either the storyteller will mimic or integrate the verbal delivery via ASL or the interpreter can come up on stage.
Integrating these bilingual storytimes into your regular programming can be challenging and working this through, we’ve found that incorporating this program into an already established storytime slot, works best. Promote it ahead of time, so that your patrons won’t be taken unawares.

Ultimately, these storytimes should be fun and engaging. You want to give the crowd something familiar while seamlessly integrating American Sign Language into your rhymes, stories and songs. The more you get into it, the more they will get into it too!

That’s all for now!

-M-

ASL Storytime – 9.7.19

I can’t believe we are doing our third ASL/English storytime. This is a storytime that I present with a deaf mother and an interpreter, in both English and sign language. Deaf families will be able to enjoy the entire program in sign language and hearing families will enjoy a storytime where they can learn some simple sign language.

These have been very successful before and really great for the community.

Here is what we have planned:

  • Rhyme – The More We Get Together
    • We learn the signs for: more, together, happy and friends.51g1x4ewbhl-_sy479_bo1204203200_

The more we get together, together, together
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be.
‘Cause your friends are my friends and my friends are your friends.
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be.

  • Identifying Animals
    • I’ve got some simple animal pictures and we teach the group these animal signs: Cow, Pig, Duck, Sheep, Cat, Dog
  • Book – I Went Walking by Sue Williams
    • I am going to attempt to do this as a repeat after me story, which is how I read it out loud. Here is what I am thinking.

Mother – I went walking.
Audience – You went walking.
Me – What did you see?
Mother – I saw a black cat. Looking at me.
Mother – I went walking.
Audience – You went walking.
Me – What did you see?
Mother – I saw a brown horse. Looking at me.
Mother – I went walking.
Audience – You went walking.
Me – What did you see?
Mother – I saw a red cow. Looking at me.
Mother – I went walking.
Audience – You went walking.
Me – What did you see?
Mother – I saw a green duck. Looking at me.
Mother – I went walking.
Audience – You went walking.
Me – What did you see?
Mother – I saw a pink pig. Looking at me.
Mother – I went walking.
Audience – You went walking.
Me – What did you see?
Mother – I saw a yellow dog. Looking at me.
Mother – I went walking.
Audience – You went walking.
Me – What did you see?
Mother – I saw a lot of animals, following me!

  • Rhyme- Old MacDonald had a Farm
    • For this one we use our animal signs we learned earlier and also the sign for “farm” and the letters “EIEIO.” When the animal makes their sounds we also sign the animal sign. I’ll highlight the first stanza so you get an idea.

Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O
And on the farm he had a COW, E I E I O
With a moo, moo here and a moo, moo there.
Here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo, moo.
Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O

Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O
And on the farm he had a DUCK, E I E I O
With a quack, quack here and a quack, quack there.
Here a quack, there a quack, everywhere a quack, quack.
Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O

Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O
And on the farm he had a PIG, E I E I O
With an oink, oink here and an oink, oink there.
Here an oink, there an oink, everywhere an oink, oink.
Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O

Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O
And on the farm he had some SHEEP, E I E I O
With a baa, baa here and a baa, baa there.
Here a baa, there a baa, everywhere a baa, baa.
Old MacDonald had a farm, E I E I O

  • Game – Sleeping, sleeping all the children were sleeping.untitled1
    • Basically, you say/sign: “Sleeping, sleeping all the children were sleeping. And when they woke up they were….” and you name/sign an animal for them to pretend to be.
    • Animals: Bear, Cow, Dog, Bird, Rabbit
  • Book w/ props – Thank You Bear by Greg Foley
    • For this one, my deaf Mother signs the book with the interpreter speaking, while I act it out with our props.
  • Rhyme – Five Little Ducks
    • This one will be similar to “Old MacDonald,” where we will only sign certain words. Again I’ll highlight the first stanza to give you an idea.

Five little ducks went out to play, over the hill and far away
Mother duck said, “Quack, quack, quack, quack
And only four little ducks came back

Four little ducks went out to play, over the hill and far away
Mother duck said, “Quack, quack, quack, quack”
And only three little ducks came back

Three little ducks went out to play, over the hill and far away
Mother duck said, “Quack, quack, quack, quack”
And only two little ducks came back

Two little ducks went out to play, over the hill and far away
Mother duck said, “Quack, quack, quack, quack”
And only one little duck came back

One little duck went out to play, over the hill and far away
Mother duck said, “Quack, quack, quack, quack”
And only no little ducks came back.

Sad mother duck went out one day, over the hill and far away
Mother duck said, “Quack, quack, quack, quack”
And all of her five little ducks came back

  • Rhyme – The More We Get Together
    • Finally, we finish how we started.

The more we get together, together, together
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be.
‘Cause your friends are my friends and my friends are your friends.
The more we get together, the happier we’ll be.

How’d it go:

Oh my goodness, what a wonderful storytime! Everything went so smoothly and the crowd really were participating, both the adults and the children. We even had some kids from the local high school come to the storytime because they are studying sign language. Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful!

That’s all for now!

-M-

ASL Storytime: Colors!

Hi Guys,

Today was a very special storytime at my library… a bilingual storytime in both English and American Sign Language. Myself along with a deaf mother and performer, created a program where we worked together to create an inclusive program for both deaf and hearing families.

Here’s what we did:

  • Rhyme – The More We Get Together
    • For this one we taught the group the signs for: more, together, happy and friends. Then we put everything together and signed the rhyme together, getting faster with our signs each time.

The more we get together
Together, together
The more we get together
The happier we’ll be

‘Cause your friends are my friends
And my friends are your friends
The more we get together
The happier we’ll be

  • Introducing Colors51cincq2+hl._sx392_bo1,204,203,200_
    • We talked about a rainbow and what colors are in a rainbow. Then we worked through the signs for: rainbow, red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple. We love the sign for rainbow!
  • Story – Brown Bear, Brown Bear What do you See? by Bill Martin Jr. and Eric Carle
    • They way we did this one was that I would ask the questions and my performer would answer. So I would sign, “Brown bear, brown bear, what do you see?” and she would respond, “I see a red bird looking at me.” And we went back and forth until the end of the story.
  • Game – Traffic Light Freeze Game5198qlx1tbl._sy401_bo1,204,203,200_
    • This is you basic traffic light freeze game except, instead of using color signs we used our color ASL signs to indicate what the kids would do. So when we did the color sign for green, the kids moved really fast. When we signed the color yellow, they slowed down. And when we signed the color red, they stopped. We played this for a few rounds and it helped get some of the wiggles out before our second story. BUT it also helped to reinforce our color signs.
  •  Story – White Rabbit’s Color Book by Alan Baker
    • For this one, my performer signed the story with her interpreter and I accompanied the story with some props. Very similar to this one. I don’t have a picture of mine, so I’ll add that later.
  • Rhyme – The More We Get Together
    • We then finish up with the same rhyme we started with.

The more we get together
Together, together
The more we get together
The happier we’ll be

‘Cause your friends are my friends
And my friends are your friends
The more we get together
The happier we’ll be

How’d it go:

This was a wonderful ASL/English storytime, with a really great turn out. We had both deaf and hearing families and everyone seemed to enjoy the program. The pacing was a little quicker than I was expecting and I think we could have easily added one more rhyme to hit that 30 minute mark. The whole program only took about 20 minutes as is.

Brown Bear is like THE perfect story to do for an ASL storytime. The signs are fairly straightforward and are not that hard to learn even if you do not know sign language. It is also a familiar story for the crowd.

This was such a fun storytime and I can’t wait to plan some more!

That’s all for now!

-M-

Baby Storytime: 9/17/18

Hi Guys!

I am so excited that we are back to our weekly baby storytimes! Our library is actually doing 4 weekly storytimes now… phew! I went back to a few of my favorite oldies and a couple of new additions for this first one back.

Here’s what I planned:

  • Welcome Rhyme – Welcome, welcome
    • This one goes to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.
  • Welcome, welcome everyone.

  • Now you’re here, we’ll have some fun.

  • First we’ll clap our hands just so.

  • Then we’ll bend and touch our toes.

  • Welcome, welcome everyone.

  • Now you’re here, we’ll have some fun!

  • ASL – The More We Get Together
    • I did this one for my ASL storytime over the summer and it went over great. So of course I am going to use it as an intro for all my storytimes this week!
    • We first teach the kids the signs for: More, Together, Happy & Friends. Then incorporate the signs as we sing the song. Check out Signing Savvy or Baby Sign Language to learn these signs. 51oulf6k3al-_sy498_bo1204203200_
  • Song w/ Movements – Tap Your Toe and Follow Me by Susan Salidor
    • This one of my favorite movement songs for babies. Simple and light.
  • Board Book – Where’s the Giraffe? by Ingela Peterson Arrhenius
    • I also pick one board book to pass out, so that we can do one-on-one reading and promote that touch and feel development. This one is extra great for the later because it’s a flip-the-flap with felt flaps.
  • Stretch – This is big, big, big…

    This is big big big Hold (arms out to side)
    This is small small small (cup hands together)
    This is short short short (hold hands with palms facing each other)
    This is tall tall tall (reach one hand above head)
    This is fast fast fast (circle fists quickly)
    This is slow slow slow (circle fists slowly)
    This is yes yes yes (nod)
    This is no no no (shake head)

  • Rhyme – Zoom, Zoom, Zoom
    • This is a fun one with simple movements and we get a lift when the babies blast off at the end.

Zoom, zoom, zoom we’re going to the moon. Zoom, zoom, zoom we’re going to the moon. If you want to take a trip, climb aboard my rocketship. Zoom, zoom, zoom we’re going to the moon. 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1… BLASTOFF!

  • Flannel – Whoosh Went the Wind
    • Gotta have a flannel or some prop in baby storytime. This one is fun because the babies and caregivers can move their arms with the wind and blow along.
  • Movement Song – Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes
    • Any version will work here. I like a nice slow one for my baby storytime.
  • Bounce – I bounce you here, I bounce you there…
    • We love our bounces and lifts in baby storytime.

I bounce you here, I bounce you there
I bounce you, bounce you everywhere
I tickle you here, I tickle you there
I tickle you, tickle you everywhere
I hug you here, I hug you there
I hug you, hug you everywhere

  • Book – Overboard!by Sarah Weeks51v4sf5ayrl-_sx443_bo1204203200_
    • This is my ultimate favorite baby storytime book because we practice our phonetic awareness with the different sounds and every time I say “overboard” the caregivers dip their babies to the side.
  • Lift – Going Up and Down in an Elevator
    • Another favorite of mine!

Going up and down in an elevator. Up and down in an elevator. Up and down in an elevator. 1st floor. 2nd floor. 3rd floor. DOWN!

  • Song/Shakers – Shake my Sillies Out
    • Just a fun one to shake our shaker eggs.
  • Song/Bubbles – Bubbles by Parachute Express
    • I love the bubble maker for the babies. Bubbles help babies because the same eye muscles the use to track the bubbles as they move, are the same muscles they will later use for reading.
  • ASL – The More We Get Together
    • I like to end with the same sign language song we used in the beginning.
  • Song – Clean It Up
    • Any good clean up song will work.
  • Song – Goodbye, So Long, Farewell by Music Together
    • I will always put this one on in the background as everyone leaves because I just love it!

How’d it go: Pretty good! A smaller group to start with, which is always the case and always nice for getting back in the swing of things. I ended up cutting out my flannel board but other than that, everything went perfectly according to plan!

That’s all for now!

-M-