Coop Knows the Scoop

Coop Knows the Scoop by Taryn Souders is a juvenile fiction book, good for 4-6th graders.

Windy Bottom, Georgia is your typical small southern town; everybody knows everybody and gossip rules the day. So when a body is found buried underneath the playground slide, it is all anyone can talk about.

Coop and his friends Liberty and Justice are just as curious as everyone else, and itching to take a peek of the crime scene. But first, they have to finish their chores at their parent’s Bookstore Cafe.

Excitement in the town is high, until fingers start pointing in a very personal direction. Coop’s gramps is somehow connected to the body and what was once harmless gossip, turns to finger pointing real quick!

Can Coop find the scoop before it is too late?

Oh man, if you are going to do this one, do the audio. It was so fun and I literally had to keep myself from speaking in a really horrible southern accent every time I listened to it.

This is a really easy read and a good one if your kids like mystery. It’s not the hardest one to uncover but there are some definitely hidden details that were a fun reveal at the end.

I liked pretty much all of the characters in this book. They really contribute to that small town feel.

I am going to use this one for my book club sometime. It’ll be a nice break after a longer or more serious book. There may not be a ton of discussion questions I can pull from it, but sometimes a lighter read is good for the kids.

This one gets 4 stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Rule of Wolves

Rule of Wolves by Leigh Bardugo is the sequel to the King of Scars duology.

As war looms and Fjerda prepares to march, Ravka and it’s allies must find a way to endure. Nikolai Lantsov must make peace with his inner demon and use all the tools at his disposal to ensure the survival of Ravka, but a darker threat inches closer every day and even he may finally be out of ideas.

Meanwhile, Zoya Nazyalensky no longer knows what she is. Instead of embracing her new powers, Zoya fights against it, refusing to lose any more of herself and those she loves.

Deep undercover in the very heart of Fjerda, Nina Zenik stamps down her grief and will risk it all for her country. But her thirst for revenge may threaten her mission.

Three souls at war with themselves, with the future in the balance. Can they overcome and save Ravka before there is no Ravka to save.

All of the Grisha books are good reads. But I read Six of Crows before any of the other ones and I can’t help but compare them all to it. That being said, this one gets bumped up an entire half-star for me because Kaz, Jasper and Wyland make a mini appearance and, without giving anything away, the very last sentence of the book hints at a third Six of Crows books–squeal!

I feel like I felt this way with King of Scars but there were a few too many narrators for me in this book. I liked each of the stories but I just thought the same goals could have been achieved with fewer. And I didn’t really think we needed the Darkling’s narration at all. It didn’t really further the story for me much.

Zoya and Nikolai’s flirtatious banter was probably my favorite aspects of the story. Nina’s storyline didn’t quite grab me the way it did in Six of Crows.

Overall, this was a good read to pick up if you enjoy the Grisha universe, which I do. This one gets 3.5 stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Ravage the Dark

Ravage the Dark by Tara Sims is the second book in the Scavenge the Stars duology.

For so long,  Amaya Chandra’s only goal was to be free of the debtor ship and it’s cruelties. But freedom is no longer enough for Amaya. She wants revenge and to reveal the truth behind the sickness sweeping across Moray.

For Cayo Mercado, revenge would be sweet, but more important is the health of his sister, which is slowly deteriorating, no thanks to his scoundrel of a father. Penniless and without hope, Cayo is lost and can see no way forward.

Though their relationship began with betrayal, can Amaya and Cayo work together for the greater good? Or will they be too caught up in their emotions and each other to help anyone at all?

This book was OK. It didn’t hold my interest even nearly as much as the first book. I missed the intrigue of book one. This one felt more like a tie up of loose ends and not a conclusion to the story.

What really soured this one for me, was the ending. All these things are happening and Amaya and Cayo just stay behind? They are hellbent on revealing the truth throughout the first and most of the second book and then it’s like they just didn’t care any more, which made me not care.

For me, this book ended up turning into background filler. It didn’t keep my attention and I found I didn’t miss, missing something when I was listening to it. For that reason, this one gets 2.5 stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

The Last Musketeer

The Last Musketeer by Stuart Gibbs is the first novel in a historical fiction series for juvenile readers.

While on a trip to Paris with his parents, fourteen-year-old Greg Rich’s parents disappear. Before his eyes, they vanish through a portrait and into the 1600s. And of course Greg follows.

And so begins a tale of the Three Musketeers before they became the legendary heroes of fiction. With the help of young Athos, Porthos and Aramis, Greg must save his parents, reveal a plot to overthrow the King, and stop the bad guy from changing history forever.

History isn’t all it’s cracked up to be and saving the day, is a lot harder… and smellier than it looks.

This was an easy, fast read. It has action and adventure, boys being boys and some interesting historical facts thrown in. It’s a Stuart Gibbs novel, you really can’t go wrong.

The Last Musketeer really makes me want to go back and read The Three Musketeers. I want to compare the characters here and the characters there and see how similar they are.

I can’t say that I was wowed by the book, but I do think it would be one my 4-6th book club would be interested in and have an easy time reading. Overall, this one gets a solid three stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Maya and the Rising Dark

Maya and the Rising Dark by Rena Barron is the first book in a new juvenile fantasy series about Orisha’s and their battle against the Dark.

Maya thinks she is just a normal twelve-year-old girl, until the day time freezes. No one seems to notice and she chalks it up to a bout of madness, that is until she sees werehyenas and is attacked by a shadow man, twice! As her friend try to come up with explanations for these weird occurrences, Maya keeps thinking about how similar these events are to her papa’s stories.

When papa goes missing, Maya is thrust into a word of gods and goddesses and learns that she is actually a godling–half orisha/half human–and that her papa is the guardian of the veil. The veil is fading and now that papa is gone, it is only a matter of time before the Lord of Shadows breaks through and wages war against the human world.

Can Maya save her father and stop the Lord of Shadows before it is too late?

I enjoyed this book a lot. It has just the right amount of fantasy mixed with African mythology for me. Maya’s journey from everyday girl to future guardian of the veil, was fun to follow and the characters were interesting and diverse. I especially want to see more of the orisha’s and see what Maya’s future “training” will entail. I don’t know why, but I see some sort of school for orisha coming.

One thing that bothered me a little bit was the loose ends. There are a lot of questions that still need answering, but I can’t be too harsh being that it is the first book in a series. Maya is learning all of this as she goes and we, the reader, are learning it right alongside her.

Overall, this was a fun read. Probably good for that 4-7 grade range. I’m going to give it the low end of 4 stars.

That’s all for now!

-M-