Coop Knows the Scoop

Coop Knows the Scoop by Taryn Souders is a juvenile fiction book, good for 4-6th graders.

Windy Bottom, Georgia is your typical small southern town; everybody knows everybody and gossip rules the day. So when a body is found buried underneath the playground slide, it is all anyone can talk about.

Coop and his friends Liberty and Justice are just as curious as everyone else, and itching to take a peek of the crime scene. But first, they have to finish their chores at their parent’s Bookstore Cafe.

Excitement in the town is high, until fingers start pointing in a very personal direction. Coop’s gramps is somehow connected to the body and what was once harmless gossip, turns to finger pointing real quick!

Can Coop find the scoop before it is too late?

Oh man, if you are going to do this one, do the audio. It was so fun and I literally had to keep myself from speaking in a really horrible southern accent every time I listened to it.

This is a really easy read and a good one if your kids like mystery. It’s not the hardest one to uncover but there are some definitely hidden details that were a fun reveal at the end.

I liked pretty much all of the characters in this book. They really contribute to that small town feel.

I am going to use this one for my book club sometime. It’ll be a nice break after a longer or more serious book. There may not be a ton of discussion questions I can pull from it, but sometimes a lighter read is good for the kids.

This one gets 4 stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Earth Day: Sand Art

Earth day is happening in just a few days on April 22nd. Earth day started all the way back in 1970 and is celebrated every year around the world to support and protect our planet. Today we are going to learn a little about this planet we call, Earth, all while doing a fun sand art activity.  

But, in order to do sand art, we need to make sand right? If you happen to have colored sand at home, good for you! But for those of you who don’t, we are going to make our own.  

So what we need are 5 sandwich baggies, food coloring and salt. I hope you all have that handy. OK. Let’s put half a cup of salt into each of the baggies. This will make way more than we need but better to have more than less, right?  

Let’s pick one of those baggies and add around 8-10 drops of GREEN food coloring. Don’t add too much or else it will make our “sand” too wet and we won’t be able to use it right away. Then I want you to squeeze out as much air from the bag as possible and zipper it shut. Shake and move around your salt until the food coloring has spread around evenly. Crack open your baggie and move on to the next.  

We are going to repeat this with, RED, YELLOW and BLUE. To make orange-ish sand, we will do 4 drops of RED and 4 drops of YELLOW food coloring in our last baggie of salt.  

Now we are ready to get started.  

OK. Hopefully you all printed your template of the Earth and it’s layers before we started, if not, grab a blank piece of paper and you can follow along with me. You’ll see we have a funny picture of the Earth, right? Well, the Earth is made up of different layers, think of an onion. We are going to color and label each of these layers. Let’s work our way in. Does anyone know what the top layer of the Earth is called? 

BLUE – Crust – The crust is the thin outer later of the Earth where we all live. It may look pretty tiny from the picture but it can be anywhere from 3 to 44 miles thick. But compared to the rest of the layers it is relatively thin.  

GREEN – Upper Mantel – begins just beneath the crust and ends at the top of the lower mantle. It is relatively solid. The upper mantle causes the tectonic plates to move and is about 255 miles thick. Heat from the center of the earth can cause these big slabs of earth to move or slip, which causes earth quakes.  

YELLO – Lower Mantel – Reaches down 1796 miles beneath the crust, where it transitions to the outer core. It is made from solid rock. The rock is hot enough to melt, but is solid because of the pressure pushing down on it. 

ORANGE – Outer Core – The Earth’s outer core is made up of iron and nickel and is very hot, up to 5000+ degrees C. The outer core is very important to earth as it creates something called a magnetic field. The magnetic field the outer core creates goes way out in to space and makes a protective barrier around the earth that shields us from the sun’s damaging solar wind. 

RED – Inner Core – The Earth’s inner core is made up of iron and nickel, just like the outer core, but the inner core is so deep within the earth that it’s under so much pressure that, even though it is so hot, it is solid. The inner core is the hottest part of the Earth, and, at over 5000 degrees C, is about as hot as the surface of the sun. 

Fun Facts about the Earth: 

  • Earth is the 3rd planet of the sun 
  • By researching our planet’s rocks, scientists have calculated the Earth to be around 4.5 billion years old! 
  • The Earth is a Goldilocks Planet. It is not too far or too close to the sun. It is just right.  
  • 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered in water and the oceans hold about 96.5 percent of all Earth’s water. 
  • There are thousands of satellites circling the Earth. Some for communication, some to study the Earth itself and some to study the universe beyond. 
  • Even though you might think you are standing still, the Earth is turning. The speed at the equator is around 1,000 mph. 

How’d it go:

A pretty simple program to prep and run. Overall, it went really well–minus by glue bottle not cooperating at first. Unless you want to make A LOT of salt/sand, I would recommend halving or more the recipe. I used 1/8th cup of salt this time around and 4 drops of food coloring and I still had a TON left over.

Gotta love crafting mixed with science!

That’s all for now!

-M-

Virtual Family Storytime: Pets!

I didn’t even realize that National Pet Day was this month when I planned this storytime. Love coincidences!

Here’s what I’ve got planned:

We will talk about early literacy tools: Read/Write/Sing/Talk/Play. We will use all of these in our storytime today but I am going to highlight PLAY. Symbolic play and dramatic play help children to develop language skills. Try acting out your favorite fairytales or stories.  

We Clap and Sing Hello 
We clap and sing hello, 
We clap and sing hello, 
With our friends at storytime, 
We clap and sing hello! 
(Wave and sing hello; jump and sing hello.) 

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi  

Today we will be talking about pets. How many of you guys have pets? I have a big old goofyball of a dog named Apollo. He’s a goldendoodle and has long curly hair. I have to brush him a lot and he takes up all the space in my bed! Pets take a lot of responsibility, right? You need to feed them, walk them, change their water or bedding, take them to the vet and more. Pets also need a lot of love. 

Letter — “P” for Pet;  
ASL – CAT / DOG / FISH / BIRD 

Some Pets by Angela DiTerlizzi read with permission of Simon & Schuster 

Love Your Pets (Tune-row, row, row your boat) 
Love, love, love your pets, 
Love them everyday. 
Give them food and water too, 
Then let them run and play. 

Game – Sleeping, sleeping all of my friends are sleeping. And when they woke up, they were… Dog/Cat/Bird/Rabbit/Pig 

I’m My Own Dog by David Ezra Stein read with permission of Candlewick Press 

How Much Is that Pet in the Window? 
How much is that doggy in the window? Woof woof! 
The one with the waggly tail? 
How much is that doggy in the window? Woof woof! 
I do hope that doggy’s for sale. 

Kitty…meow…long whiskers 
Bird… tweet tweet…flappity wings 
Rabbit…hop hop…hoppity legs  
Fish… glub glub… swimmy fins 

Flannel – Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell used with permission of Simon & Schuster 

I Had A Little Turtle 
I had a little turtle 
His name is Tiny Tim 
I put him in the bathtub 
To see if he could swim. 
He drank up all the water 
He ate up all the soap 
And now he’s home sick in bed with bubbles in his throat! 
Bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble pop! 

Charlotte and the Rock by Martin, Stephen W., read with permission of Penguin Random House 

Takeaway – I like to give an easy take-away craft, so I made my own pet rock to show them and encourage them to make their own!

We Clap Goodbye Like This 
We clap goodbye like this, 
We clap goodbye like this, 
With our friends at storytime, 
We clap goodbye like this!  

(We wave goodbye like this; We stomp goodbye like this) 

How’d it go:

We had fun today. I was a little tongue tied here and there but I think everyone had fun!

That’s all for now!

-M-

Folder Story: There Once Was a Grumpy Pirate

For virtual storytime, there is nothing better than a good folder story. I’ve been working on creating a few of my own and decided to try a “porthole” story for an upcoming pirate theme storytime.

Here’s what I came up with:

There once was a grumpy pirate, 
His grumpy name was Fred. 
He groaned, he moaned, he sighed… 
He wouldn’t get out of bed. 
 
“Up!” tisked his mom,  
“It’s time to get ye dressed! 
“Sleepy pirates, never find, 
“The golden treasure chest.” 
 
So up Fred hopped and dressed he got, 
A hat and eye patch too. 
A shiny hook. A leg of wood. 
In search of gold doubloon. 

I created four porthole paper plates with scenes behind it, that I will show as I say the rhyme:

These were super easy to make. I just took paper plates, cut out the middle and painted them yellow. My background is just taped to the back of each plate. I decided not to laminate them because I didn’t want it to be too shiny for virtual storytime.

This would work too for an under the sea storytime, because you could pretend you are on a yellow submarine!

That’s all for now!

-M-

4-6th Grade Virtual Book Discussion: Boy Bites Bug w/ DIY Chromatography Butterfly 

Boy Bites Bug by Rebecca Petruck is a middle school juvenile fiction book for 4th-6th graders. 

Will didn’t intend to eat a stinkbug, but when his friend Darryl calls the new kid, Eloy Herrera, a racial slur, he didn’t think he just acted. Now will is Bug Boy and he kind of likes it. 

Intending to keep up his notoriety and title as Bug Boy, Will talks Eloy into helping him get his classmates to eat bugs. But the more Will learns about Eloy and entomophagy in general, the more sincere he becomes about his project. For Will, eating bugs is no longer just a joke but everyone sees it that way. And what’s worse, he really likes Eloy and is afraid he may have ruined this budding friendship. 

What can Will do to make everyone understand his real intentions when all anyone can see if a joke? 

Discussion Questions: 

1. What is this book about? What are the main themes? 

2. What is the difference between entomophagy and entomology?  

3. Will doesn’t intend to eat a stinkbug but he does it anyway. Why? And why is this so important to the story? 

4. In many cultures eating insects is commonly practiced. Have you ever eaten a bug? Why do you think there is a stigma around eating bugs? 

5. What do you think about Will as a character? Is he relatable, over-the-top, silly…

6. As Will’s friendship with Elroy grows, he and Darryl start to grow apart. When Will asks his dad for advice he says: “Sometimes,” Dad said, “people outgrow each other.  It doesn’t mean we stop caring or forget the good times, but maybe we realize we need different things, things that we can’t get from each other anymore.” Have you every “outgrown” a friendship? Or has anyone “outgrown” you? How did it make you feel? 

7. Will gets in the whole mess because he didn’t like how Darryl was treat Eloy but Will has his own prejudices that he isn’t even aware. What are some examples? 

8. What did you think about the “Buck-a-Bug” fundraiser? Was Will able to successfully turn Entomophagy from a joke into a good cause? 

9. In the background of this story, is Will’s longing to be on the varsity wrestling team. Before his big match his coach says, “Take a breath… Whatever’s going on, it’ll still be there when you get off the matt.” Do you ever feel like you can escape into a hobby and let everything else go? 

10. Think about cultural differences around the world. Can you name some things that would be done every day somewhere else, that might see unusual here? And vic-versa, what might we do that other would look on as “different.”  

DIY Activity: Chromatography Butterfly 

Supplies Needed: white coffee filters (large size, not Kcups); non-permanent markers; cup of water; string; scissors; pipe cleaners optional. 

Directions: 

  1. Pick a marker (try with multiple marks on your second attempt and see what happens). 
  1. Take one coffee filter and spread it out on top of a piece of paper. Draw a circle in the flat middle of the filter. 
  1. Fold the coffee filter in half and then in half again. It will look somewhat like a cone.  
  1. Get a short glass of water and stick the filter in with just the tip of the cone touching the water. Fan out the rest so it balances in the cup.  
  1. Let sit and watch what happens as the filter sucks up the water.  
  1. Flatten it out and place on your paper or newspaper to dry.  
  1. Once dry, take your filter and scrunch it in the middle. Tie the middle with string or your pipe cleaner. If you are using the pipe cleaner, the ends can still out to look like antenna.  
  1. Hang the butterfly with string and watch them fly! 

The Science:  

“Chromatography… is the science of separating mixtures. Mikhail Tsvet discovered that since different color pigments have different weights, they are carried along at different speeds, and end up in different places. So one can use different substances (gas or liquid) to carry the color, and by examining where different tints end, figure out what pigments were combined to make it.” 
-(https://kidminds.org/chromatography-experiments-with-kids-5-ways/)

How’d it go:

We had a great group for book club this month! Some new faces and some really great discussion. We had a little trouble getting the hang of how far to dip our coffee filters into the water, but it was all part of trial and error. This was a good month!

That’s all for now!

-M-